The World Cup is considered the best football showpiece on the planet. It is a competition that all th top professionals want to play in. It is a quadrennial tournament that determines the best football nation in the world. The size of what is at stake makes it the most popular event in the world, attracting billions of viewers every four years.

As we slowly get closer and closer to the World Cup, in Qatar 2022, we take a closer look at the stadiums that will host the World Cup…

Since 2001, FIFA have highlighted the criteria for world cup stadiums, a standard world cup stadium must have at least 40,000 minimum capacity. For the Quarter final matches, the minimum required capacity is 60,000 while final matches and opening ceremony must have 80,000 capacity. If you used a bonus code ladbrokes you can get great odds on the Final being a repeat of the Russia 2018 one, with France taking on Croatia once more – though will time have slowed Luka Modric down too much by then?

For Qatar 2022 there will be no difference to the standard approach, and Qatar is almost ready to host the world in 2022.

– The Lusail Stadium, it’s still a work in progress and it is expected to be completed before 2021. The Lusail Stadium is 80,000 capacity stadium and it is expected to host the opening ceremony and the final match of the 2022 competition.

– Al Wakrah Stadium – The stadium is 40,000-capacity stadium. Due to the relatively small size, it is expected to host group stage matches.

– ArRayyan Stadium – This is a 40,000-capacity stadium and it is expected to host group stage matches.

– Doha stadium is expected to be ready by 2021 and the stadium will host group stage matches.

– AlKhor Stadium – This is a 60,000-capacity stadium, also known as AlBayt Stadium, the stadium will host round of 16 and quarter final matches in the finals.

More playing grounds have also been proposed for the finals, but it is most unlikely they are ready in time for the showpiece in 2022.

Whilst the stadiums have had some issues (mainly around the safety and working conditions of employees building them), you cannot argue that they are not amazing structures in their own right, and will act as monuments to what promises to be a fantastic festival of football. With the World Cup set to move on to USA / Canada / Mexico’s joint bid in 2026, expect the Emirates countries to put on a great show of hosting fans and teams, at almost any expense.